Greece, Corbyn: Economic & Political Reality

With sympathetic WordPress technology, it may be possible for me to move beyond twitter and become a blogger! This demands much more including a willingness for self-revelation (though for anyone reading behind the tweets, nothing could be more revelatory) and connected thinking!
About what? If it’s not ‘thinking about thinking’ (guided by Heidegger and Arendt), it’s likely to be ontology, reality and Being.
So why the ‘obsession’ with Greece? 
The psychological fear is that I’ve not had enough to do or think about, which may be true!
However, the strength of my intuition about the potential implosion not only in Greece but also within the EU would not leave me. It took me to Greece and led me to Adam Nicholson’s wonderful “The Mighty Dead: Why Homer Matters”. 
Now it seems as if imminent catastrophe may have been avoided: was it not J.M.Keynes who observed: ‘in the end, we are all dead’? Perhaps political sense will prevail and people will turn out to be seen as more important even than economic ‘realities’.
Which nearly takes me back to ‘reality’. 
In UK presently, we are swept up in a most unexpected question: will Jeremy Corbyn become the entirely unlikely new leader of the Labour Party? He has none of Tsipras’ charisma, not even youth. He’s a ‘backbencher’ – one of those MPs who never sought and was never rewarded with ‘office’, unsurprising given over 500 rebellions against the ‘whips’, the authority of the party or its leadership.
But what of his economics? 95% (a conservative estimate) of the population understands nothing of economics or money, so votes are on ‘confidence’ and ‘trust’. Surely a left-wing agenda is discredited, implausible, unelectable? 
The political tectonic plates are shifting. We are – despite the last election – likely to be entering the era of coalitions. Paul Mason’s ‘Post-Capitalism’ underlines the technological changes that the Information Age brings with it.
‘Reality’? Who knows? Certainly I cannot bear too much of it.

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